Vulcanite

Diameter:2.25"Type:Sport
Length:53.3"Status:Active / 11 flights
Motor Mount:38mmBuild Dates:1998-07-12 to 1998-12-01

I built the Vulcanite for a science project in sixth grade. It turned out to be one of the best rockets that I have today. The Vulcanite is a LOC/Precision kit. It is 54mm in diameter x 5 ft. tall, with a 38mm motor mount. I have flown it on H123s, H242s, I154s, I211s, and I130s.

Flights

Date: January 12th, 2002

Motor: AT H242

Fast and high flight that got lost against the haze layer. We later tracked it down and recovered it with no damage.

Event: LDRS 20

Date: July 19th, 2001

Motor: AT I211

This flight went as well as the previous one did. It also showed up on Earl Cagle's LDRS 20 video as the first flight of the launch. COOL! Unfortunately, the ALTACC data was lost. (That thing was finicky sometimes.)

Event: ROCStock 12

Date: November 12th, 2000

Motor: Kosdon I130

Apogee: 7,254 ft

This was to be on our first Kosdon motor, an I130 C-slot. (*cough*WIMP*cough* :)) We had Hulan Matthies (veteran Kosdon guy) help us load up the motor, it being our first of the type. After a few snap-ring troubles, we loaded the rocket and put it on the pad. The waiver was called in, a 5 count ensued, and... nothing. The igniter blew off the pyrogen. Hmmm... what to do, we've got 1 minute left in the waiver, ok, let's reload the ignitor and get it off before the waiver closes. A little thermalite and another daveyfire later, we were back in business. 5...4...3...2...1...launch and the rocket huffed, puffed, and took off. It was a beautiful up flight, and the trademark Kosdon delay formulation did its job and made the rocket easy to track. The chute came out at apogee and it came home intact. That was great.

Event: ROCStock X

Date: November 13th, 1999

Motor: AT I211

Apogee: 6,061 ft

We decided to try it on an I211 because RockSim said it should work. We flew this at ROCStock 9 in June of 1999. It went 6100 feet really really fast. It also flew really straight with just a little wobble. The walk was relatively short, and the altimeter said 6061 feet. Success.

Event: ROCStock IX

Date: June 12th, 1999

Motor: AT I154

Apogee: 5,250 ft

The I154 was the biggest BlackJack available at the time, and since I loved the long burn -J propellant, we got one to put in the Vulcanite. The flight was nice and straight on a dense column of black smoke to just under a mile.

Event: ROC April 1999

Date: April 10th, 1999

Motor: AT H123

Apogee: 3,994 ft

The last flight of the day was also the highest, and went completely smoothly. Even the walk was short. An extremely successful day, and I got an A+ on my project!

Event: ROC April 1999

Date: April 10th, 1999

Motor: AT H242

Apogee: 3,909 ft

This flight (borrowing the chute from our Laser/LOC) was completely nominal.

Event: ROC April 1999

Date: April 10th, 1999

Motor: AT H123

Apogee: 3,894 ft

Flight 4 was the only less-than-nominal flight for today; we had neglected to tie the shroud lines to the shock cord (only attached using a Lark's Head knot), and at apogee, the chute slid up the cord, slicing the shrouds and separating the chute from the vehicle. Carl Delzell was nice enough to chase the parachute down, and I recovered the rocket from the range with no damage.

Event: ROC April 1999

Date: April 10th, 1999

Motor: AT H242

Apogee: 3,814 ft

Flight 3 went without a hitch as well; while the rocket was being recovered from flight 2, the next motor was built up. A rhythm was developing and turnaround time was decreased to five minutes or so to remove the previous motor, repack the chute and wadding, and fill out a new flight card.

Event: ROC April 1999

Date: April 10th, 1999

Motor: AT H123

Apogee: 3,874 ft

Flight two was on an H123W. We had borrowed an extra case from motor vendor Ken Finwall to decrease prep time, and after the rocket was recovered, it was turned around again in 15 minutes or so. Flight two was nominal, with a long walk for recovery.

Event: ROC April 1999

Date: April 10th, 1999

Motor: AT H242

Apogee: 3,954 ft

The first of six flights went without a hitch; the ALTS2 was armed as the rocket was placed on the pad, with no external wires or anything. Simple and reliable. This first flight was fast and straight.

I like to design, build, and fly rockets. PostFlight started as a project to help me keep track of them. Now I've opened it up so you can follow along, too.
I fly with:
Indiana Rocketry, Inc. MDRA
Hey! What are you doing down here? The rocket stuff (yea, it's © 2017 David Reese) is up there!